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About the European legislation on organic wine


When we buy a bottle of wine where on the the label we read the words ORGANIC WINE and we can see the UE logo organic wine logo, all of us have the guarantee to buy food whose production, from the vineyard to bottling, is governed by laws. And not only, all of us also have to know that those laws are more restrictive compared to those observed in the production of common wine.
 
In the specific case of our bottle, all of us wine lovers we are protected by the European regulation on organic wine that with the UE law 203/2012 lays down the rules to be observed by those who produce organic wines in Europe.
 
The above mentioned Law was adopted on March 8, 2012 and takes full effect from August 1, 2012.
 
From this date onwards the entire production process of organic wine is regulated and is finally bridged the legislative gap that, until that time, persisted on winemaking, that as we know is not less important of the cultivation cicle.
 
Before the mentioned date, we speak, in terms of law, of "organic viticulture" or "wine from organic grapes". Before, there were the European Regulations about the organic viticulture, the rules on the production of organic grapes.
 
European legislation on organic wine confirms, of course, that the organic wines can be made only from organic grapes but the law extends its efficacy to the delicate phase of vinification and goes to discipline the process with certain rules.
 
Many and more prohibitions or restrictions are placed respect to the so-called conventional wines. Especially about substances, additives, treatments and winemaking practices.
 
In relation to the so much discussed sulfites, it is worth mentioning again that the "organic wine European Laws" establish the maximum levels of sulfites allowed in organic red wines at 100 mg per liter, compared to 150 mg per liter of the red common wines, and for white and rosé organic wines at 150 mg per liter, against the 200 mg per liter of the conventional white or rosé wines.

May be of interest...